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  • Writer's pictureJan Bishop

Family History & Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Updated: Oct 17, 2023


Woman holding Breast Cancer Ribbon.
Woman holding Breast Cancer Ribbon.

According to Nationaltoday.com, October is also AIDS Awareness Month, Blindness Awareness Month, Down Syndrome Awareness Month, Healthy Lung Month, National Critical Illness Month, and other medical conditions.

Physician reviewing Medical History
Medical History

Family Medical History can impact your health. Be aware of your family's health conditions and educate yourself about whether these conditions are genetic or not. I am not trying to worry you; I want to inform you. Many conditions can be minimized or avoided (like type II diabetes) with healthy lifestyle choices. Knowing the symptoms of conditions can also be helpful. So many conditions have overlapping symptoms, making diagnosis difficult for physicians. Arming yourself with Family Health knowledge can help lead to early detection and intervention. Family Medical History can impact your health.



My great-grandfather Peter Ferdinand Anderson died at an early age (almost 38 years old) from cancer in 1928. Back then, the main cancer treatment was radiation therapy. On his death certificate, an x-ray was noted. It was also noted that he had the cancer for three years before he died. He left my great-grandmother Essie with five children to raise on her own. Their youngest was just one year old. My Grandmother Rosalie was three years old.


If you cannot speak to your family about your medical family history, you can look at death certificates, like I did for my Great-Grandfather. The death certificates state the reason for death. Or you may consider taking a DNA test with a health predisposition component. A complete family history should include three generations.


Addictions

Alzheimer's Disease

Arthritis

Asthma

Cancer

Depression

High Blood Pressure

Heart Disease

Obesity

Osteoporosis

Many factors can increase the risk of developing diseases, such as smoking, lack of exercise, and poor diet.


Breast Cancer Risk Factors.
Breast Cancer Risk Factors.


You know the saying, "Knowledge is power." when it comes to Medical Family History, this motto holds true. You can't change your DNA, but you can decrease your risks by avoiding them. You will also want to share this information with your healthcare provider, as they can help guide you to some best practices for diminishing your risks.


Please note I am not a physician; this post is only for information. If you have questions about inherited diseases or need medical advice, I recommend you contact your healthcare provider to discuss your concerns and individual recommendations for yourself or family members.


Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links; by using the links, I may receive a commission for qualifying purchases.


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Guest
Oct 12, 2023
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I am so glad for cancer awareness month. My mother had breast cancer and fortunately it was caught early.

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Jan Bishop
Jan Bishop
Oct 25, 2023
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I am so glad it was caught early. Thanks for stopping by.

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Sharing Life's Moments
Sharing Life's Moments
Oct 11, 2023

This is vital information for a person to have. I have been finding out that my family is full of all kinds of various cancers and other health issues. The older I get the more I seem to be getting hit with. This is an important reminder for sure!

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Jan Bishop
Jan Bishop
Oct 13, 2023
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Thanks for stopping by. I am glad you found the information helpful.

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Guest
Oct 11, 2023

Dee | GrammysGrid.com wrote: I'd be too afraid to have my DNA tested, too dangerous. See my blog post as to why. My daughter (age mid 30s) went for cancer treatment out of the country as all the doctors at three major cancer centers here in the US wanted to do was perform body disfiguring surgery along with chemo and radiation. She said NO! With an all natural treatment and a super healthy diet, the cancer went away!! Her doctors here in the US are still scratching their heads, they just don't understand it, of course I don't think they were taught to cure, just prescribe. Thanks so much for linking up at the #UnlimitedLinkParty 133.

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Jan Bishop
Jan Bishop
Oct 13, 2023
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Hi Dee, I am so glad to hear that your daughter is recovered. Our bodies are incredible. I will have to go read your blog about DNA, I am very interested. Thanks for stopping by and for leaving a comment.

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Guest
Oct 11, 2023

Good things to know and keep in mind! We get lots of things from our families. :) You grandfather sounds a lot like my great-grandfather who passed when he was 32 leaving my great-grandmother with 7 children. He died in the flu epidemic of 1918-1919. My mom died at the end of September (8 years ago) from breast cancer and her funeral was a few days later, which was October, so I never forget breast cancer awareness month. Even though her type of cancer doesn't put me at an elevated risk, I get a mammogram every year on her birthday. Thanks for sharing this post at the Will Blog for Comments #10 linkup. :)

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Jan Bishop
Jan Bishop
Oct 13, 2023
Replying to

Thanks so much for stopping by. I am glad you found the information helpful.

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